Math 012: College Algebra
Rapid review of basic techniques of factoring, rational expressions, equations and inequalities; functions and graphs; exponential and logarithm functions; systems of equations; matrices and determinants; polynomials; and the binomial theorem. Please Note: The University of Illinois has a policy stating that courses numbered 000-099 are considered to be remedial courses. The following statement appears on the back of the UIUC transcript: "000-099 Noncredit, preparatory courses". If you have questions regarding whether this course will transfer to your program please check with your institution prior to registering in the course. Students with a Bachelor's degree will be assessed graduate level tuition rate for this course. However, one cannot receive graduate level credit for courses numbered below 400 at the University of Illinois.

Math 114: Trigonometry
Studies degrees and radians, the trigonometric functions, identities and equations, inverse functions, oblique triangles and applications. Students with a Bachelor's degree will be assessed graduate level tuition rate for this course. However, one cannot receive graduate level credit for courses numbered below 400 at the University of Illinois.

Math 115 (Section A16): Preparation for Calculus
This course reviews trigonometric, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, and introduces finding the area under a curve. Intended for students who need preparation for MATH 220, either because they lack the content background or because they are not prepared for the rigor of a university calculus course. Credit is not given for both MATH 115 and either MATH 114 or MATH 016. Students may not receive credit for MATH 115 if MATH 115 is taken after receiving credit for MATH 220 or MATH 221. Students with a Bachelor's degree will be assessed graduate level tuition rate for this course. However, one cannot receive graduate level credit for courses numbered below 400 at the University of Illinois.

Math 124: Finite Mathematics
This course introduces and explores various areas in finite mathematics including systems of linear equations, matrices, input-output analysis, maximizing or minimizing linear functions of two or more variables subject to linear inequality constraints, sophisticated counting, mathematical probability and the mathematics of finance. Students will experience how these mathematical techniques can be used in business applications. Students learn how to think critically and analytically. This is accomplished by by taking real world problems and converting them into mathematical problems, which can be solved using the techniques learned. Students with a Bachelor's degree will be assessed graduate level tuition rate for this course. However, one cannot receive graduate level credit for courses numbered below 400 at the University of Illinois.

Math 220: Calculus I
A first course in calculus and analytic geometry; basic techniques of differentiation and integration with applications including curve sketching; antidifferentation, the Riemann integral, fundamental theorem, exponential and circular functions.

Math 231: Calculus II
Second course in calculus and analytic geometry: techniques of integration, conic sections, polar coordinates, and infinite series.

Math 234: Calculus for Business
Introduction to the concept of functions and the basic ideas of calculus. Students with a Bachelor's degree will be assessed graduate level tuition rate for this course. However, one cannot receive graduate level credit for courses numbered below 400 at the University of Illinois.

Math 241: Calculus III
Third course in calculus and analytic geometry including: vector analysis, Euclidean space, partial differentiation, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, the integral theorems of vector calculus.

Math 285: Differential Equations
Intended for engineering students and others who require a working knowledge of differential equations; included are techniques and applications of ordinary differential equations and an introduction to partial differential equations.

Math 286: Differential Equations Plus
Techniques and applications of ordinary differential equations, including Fourier series and boundary value problems, linear systems of differential equations, and an introduction to partial differential equations. Covers all the MATH 285 plus linear systems. Intended for engineering majors and other who require a working knowledge of differential equations.

Math 292: Vector Calculus Supplement
Course in multivariable calculus. Topic include gradient divergence, and curl; line and surface integrals; and the theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss. Intended for transfer students whose multivariable calculus course did not include the integral theorems of vector calculus. Credit is not given for both MATH 292 and MATH 241. Students with a Bachelor's degree will be assessed graduate level tuition rate for this course. However, one cannot receive graduate level credit for courses numbered below 400 at the University of Illinois.

Math 299 - NetMath Certificate Capstone Course
Math 299 is the final course towards qualifying for the NetMath certificate program. This course involves writing a paper to demonstrate and apply the knowledge you have gained from taking NetMath courses. There are no quizzes or exams, and the course grade is based on the following: - Proposal for capstone paper (30%) - Capstone paper (60%) - Communication with instructor (10%) For prerequisites, please see the NetMath Certificate Program. Students with a Bachelor's degree will be assessed graduate level tuition rate for this course. However, one cannot receive graduate level credit for courses numbered below 400 at the University of Illinois.

Math 348: Advanced Composition in Fundamental Mathematics
Please Read: This course will NOT be offered during the Spring 2014 or Summer 2014 semesters. This course prepares freshmen, sophomore, and transfer students for work in upper division mathematics courses by teaching selected fundamental topics from discrete and continuous mathematics, techniques of proof and computer simulation, and good mathematical exposition. This course satisfies both the Quantitative Reasoning II and the Composition II Gen Ed requirements. For more information, please see Prof. George Francis's Math 348 website.

Math 402
Please Read: This course will NOT be offered during the Spring 2014 or Summer 2014 semester This course is a practical introduction Non-Euclidean geometry from an experimental viewpoint. It is also a thorough review of axiomatic and analytical Euclidean geometry, as well as a gentle introduction to complex numbers. It also serves as an introduction to rigorous proofs and good mathematical exposition. While experience with plane vectors and symbolic logic are recommended, motivated students may complete supplementary lessons to learn these techniques early in the term. To pursue these twin goals quoted above, we use a balanced mixture of contemporary online and classical learning techniques. Hvidsten's temporarily out of print textbook is online together with extensive notes, explanations, examples, tutorials and exercises. We use a custom edition of his geometric drawing software, Geometry Explorer (GEX), which downloads to all platforms. Students have the opportunity to learn and use LaTeX, the universal scientific and technical typesetting tool, with our custom webtool texWins. Students also keep a hand-written journal of what they have learned, which may be used during tests. We use the ATLAS Moodle for online consultation, discussion, and submission of homework. Daily work (30%), tests(40%) and the final (30%) are announced in the online syllabus. See http://new.math.uiuc.edu/netmath402 for more information.

Math 415: Applied Linear Algebra
Introductory course emphasizing techniques of linear algebra with applications to engineering; topics include matrix operations, determinants, linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, inner products and norms, orthogonality, equilibrium, and linear dynamical systems.

Math 461: Introduction to Probability Theory
Introduction to mathematical probability; includes the calculus of probability, combinatorial analysis, random variables, expectation, distribution functions, moment-generating functions, and central limit theorem.